UPDATE: I Just Spent $20 on FastPasses! Would You?

| July 7, 2014 | 46 Replies

For quite some time now, Disney Parks fans have been discussing the possibility of purchasing FastPasses to attractions and entertainment experiences. Rumors have circulated for years that this would be the next direction Disney would go in whether it be done directly by buying an allotment of passes or indirectly based on the hotel tier a guest reserves accommodations at. Now that FastPass+ has come to fruition, the conversation has died down…that is, until today, and I was immediately sucked in. (See the update at the bottom of this article)

 

DL Tour (600x338)

 

In preparation for my annual trip to the west coast parks, I came across information about a tour called Welcome to Disneyland Resort. Because I enjoyed both A Walk in Walt’s Footsteps and the Backstage Magic trip from Adventures by Disney, I decided to check this out and was pleasantly surprised by what the 2 1/2 hour experience included:

  • Two pre-selected attractions during the tour
  • Two free FASTPASS attractions to enjoy after the tour
  • Assistance with dining reservations for the day of your tour
  • VIP viewing for Aladdin: The Musical or Mickey & the Magical Map
  • A World of Color “FASTPASS” for the evening of your tour
  • An exclusive collectible trading pin and lanyard

A guided tour of both parks sprinkled with trivia and tips, a ride on two attractions, VIP viewing for my favorite Disney stage show, a FastPass for World of Color, AND two extra FastPasses?  At only $20 for Disney Vacation Club members (there are other discounts; see below), this was a steal. I was sold! The cost of the pin and lanyard alone would equal that amount. My mind was set.

DL Tour 4 (600x399)

 

It then dawned on me as to what was actually happening here. Other than the VIP viewing for Aladdin, I was most interested in this tour because I would not have to wait in line for five attractions. I was literally paying for FastPasses! This is something I never thought I’d do before and here I was throwing my credit card information into the metaphorical pocket of the Mouse House. Wow.

 

Was this so bad? Sure, it goes against the idea that Disney already vacuum-sucks a large amount of my paycheck every year (hello, I’m not called the DIS Shopping Queen for nothing), so why spend extra; but in reality, what’s wrong with it? For some, I guess there’s an ethical issue here. Why should we shell out more money on top of the already exorbitant ticket prices?  Is it fair for those that can’t afford this? Would it be better served if such an option existed only for those staying at a Disney resort or a specific level of resort?

 

DL Tour 2 (427x600)

 

I have also been thinking about the main purpose of this experience; it is a tour after all. In reality, I’m not as enthusiastic about that component as I am about the attraction experiences that are included. While I am not an expert by any means, I do not consider myself a novice guest of Disneyland or Disney’s California Adventure. I know perhaps a bit more than the basics from the many trips I have taken over the years, so do I really need a guided tour? Disney touts it as being for both first time guests and those who have visited in the past. Yet, do I really need assistance in making dining reservations or an introduction to the attractions and layout of the parks? Probably not. However, the opportunity to learn a few fun facts and trivia tidbits will be worth it along with a Cast Member welcome to my vacation.

 

DL Tour 6 (600x399)

 

This brings me to my next pondering: would I pay for something like this in Walt Disney World? That depends. If the new FastPass+ system did not exist, I think that this would be a great option, and perhaps that’s why we’re seeing it at Disneyland who does not have the same technology. With the ease and convenience of FastPass+ though, I would not pay the cost of the tour. You already get limited wait times with park admission and can personalize them yourself using the My Disney Experience app. With that being said, Walt Disney World has also recently added two additional tours that offer attraction access for those interested: The Ultimate Day for Young Families – A VIP Tour Experience and The Ultimate Day of Thrills – A VIP Tour Experience.

 

DL Tour 7 (600x398)

 

Okay, let’s take it a step further then and concentrate on Disneyland. Would I pay for something like this without the tour piece to the deal? I think the answer is a resounding yes. The cost is too good to be true especially for visitors like me who primarily visit the parks during peak seasons when the crowds and temperatures are at their highest. Having reduced wait times and VIP viewing of Aladdin is worth the cost.

 

DL Tour 3 (600x379)

 

In the end, I’m satisfied with my decision to purchase tickets to this tour. I think it will be a great refresher of the parks and way to begin my time at Disneyland Resort. With the added bonuses, it is that much more worth it. For those interested, the tour runs Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays at 10:30 a.m. with a capacity of 20 people per tour. Reservations can be made by calling (714) 781-8687 up to 30 days in advance. The cost is $25 unless you have Disney Vacation Club, Disney VISA, AAA, or an annual pass which brings it down to $20. Our Disneyland podcast did a review of this tour last June, which you can check out here.

What are your thoughts about the Welcome to Disneyland tour? Would you pay for FastPasses in either Disneyland or Walt Disney World? Should this be an option in the future? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

 

UPDATE:

A group of friends and I went on the Welcome to Disneyland Tour this past week. Our party was made up of all adults ranging in ages and familiarity with the west coast parks. Each person had visited Disneyland Resort before, but some had not for a few years. We went into this experience knowing that some of the tour would be information we already knew yet were excited about what it included in terms of FastPasses and VIP viewing.

We checked in just after 10 a.m. at Disneyland’s Tour Garden booth. This location is where all guided tours depart from; you can also see if there is any availability for a specific experience here as well. We were seated at outdoor tables and served cold water which was a nice surprise on such a warm day. California has been unusually humid and hot lately, so I was very grateful. We also received name badges and had a surprise visit by Alice and the Mad Hatter who saw that we were waiting for the tour to begin. They were a hoot!

 

photo 1 (10) (600x450)

photo 2 (6) (600x450)

 

The tour began promptly at 10:30 a.m. and took us to a variety of locations in both Disney California Adventure and Disneyland. While I do not want to give away all of the details of what we experienced, I will say that it did include a visit to both It’s Tough to be a Bug and Pirates of the Caribbean. FastPasses were given to us for World of Color, Soarin’, and Star Tours; we were then offered VIP viewing of either Aladdin: The Musical or Mickey & the Magical Map, as expected, which was wonderful, as well as a commemorative pin. Note that all of these offerings are subject to change and the attractions you are taken to during the tour itself could vary depending on your party’s demographic. We were joined by another family with children so that could have impacted it. Still, they were fun to see and do.

This tour is advertised as one for both new visitors and regulars. However, this is where we all found it lacking. It was definitely geared more towards those who have never visited the resort before and perhaps those who are even new to Disney Parks. Our tour guide offered to make a dining reservation for us, for example, along with explained how to use FastPass, BabySwap, etc. The trivia and information presented while walking around the parks was all common knowledge. This was a bit disappointing.

 

Our FastPasses and commemorative pins were bundled up together and given at the end of the tour.

Our FastPasses and commemorative pins were bundled up together and given at the end of the tour.

 

All in all, every person in our party agreed that this was an excellent way for first-time visitors to become familiar with the Disneyland Resort and what it has to offer. However, note that it is not an experience for guests who visit often. I thought it was a nice way to re-familiarize those who haven’t been to the parks in awhile with the layout of the land and all it has to offer especially at the start of a vacation. When considering the cost we paid ($20), everyone agreed that you do get your money’s worth despite the misleading advertising of the tour’s target audience. The FastPasses and VIP viewing were fantastic and worth every penny in the hot summer heat and crowds. Would it be something to do every trip? Definitely not – which wasn’t what I expected anyway.

I hope that this has helped you understand more of our experience on the tour. Thanks for reading!

 

Image Credits:

Disney Media

N. Mancini

 


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Category: Disneyland

About the Author ()

Born and raised in New Jersey, Nicole is an avid Disney fan and frequents both Walt Disney World and Disneyland several times each year. Interests include Walt Disney Imagineering, merchandise, dining, backstage tours, and more. You can also find her on The DIS Unplugged forum on DISBoards.com. Be sure to check out Nicole's other articles here on the DIS Blog and follow her on Twitter @DISNikkiBell for regular updates about all things Disney!
  • Cherie

    Disneyworld needs to offer something in the summer. The large groups from Brazil take up most of the lines during this time. I feel that maybe the more expensive resorts like Grand Floridian should give fast passes to those staying there like Universal does,

    • mickeymommy7

      Got news for you, those tour groups are at WDW all year ’round. Our winter is their summer so they are quite heavy then too.

      • ppiew

        My neighbor paid $80 per child to attend a very low end (think carnival atmosphere) county fair. was that ‘fair”? Not to me but it was to their family. Friends went to Las Vegas for a gambling trip – very pricey when all said and done. for me – no, but they loved it. We all chose where to spend out $$. it is your choice. don’t blame Disney. they are constantly updating the parks and spending a bundle to bring back v isitors. By the way, been to a movie lately ?? Think tickets, popcorn etc for family of 4 and you can kiss $100 good by. And it only lasts 2 hours!!!!

    • lisa theobald

      So make Disney for the rich again, and make more of those with less money be unable to go because of long lines and seeing nothing.

      • Nicole L. Mancini

        I’m not sure I see how this is happening. Even without the use of FP+, park guests can see and do most everything they’d like during a trip.

        • lisa theobald

          Fast pass lines become longer, makes regular lines longer. For those with health issues in their family. Going to a park for 6 hours and riding 5 rides because of long lines is not good.

          • Nicole L. Mancini

            That’s why I go in with the mentality of not doing everything and selecting a few things I’d like to do; anything accomplished beyond that is a bonus. I never mentioned above doing everything, but everything a person would “like” to do during a trip, and this falls under that mentality. I’ve been to Walt Disney World over 30 times and have not once gone in thinking I need to do absolutely every attraction during a single trip. It’s not realistic.

            My elderly parents went in May and used FastPass+ without issue. They saw what they wanted to and did not stay in the parks from opening until closing for the week. My father was in an ECV and both of them have health issues. Have you used FP+ in the past few months? Things are much different than its initial testing phase.

          • lisa theobald

            Yes, we had fast pases before we left. I spendt my time pacing in a wheelchair. That’s great if you can go 30 times and can see everything. That’s my point. If you’re a family that has to save for years and years, and it’s a real treat, you want to see as much as you can.

          • Nicole L. Mancini

            I completely understand that. What I disagree with is your original comment stating that people go (including those who save for years) and see nothing. That’s just not the case. Disney – and any vacation, for that matter – is expensive. Some have to save for a long time. Others never have a chance to go. It’s all what you set out to accomplish.

          • CliftonPark GMan

            I agree. I absolutely laugh when I see folks checking off every attraction on their map. They feel like if they missed something and have disappointment in their experience. I have seen friends from mine at each others throats by the 2nd Day because they were trying to do everything and had every meal planned out too. My philosophy is that if you don’t see something then you have something to look forward to on your next visit. If that attraction is gone then it really wasn’t that good anyways.

            When on vacation why anyone would want to have a schedule and stress? You can stay at work for that. Disney is all about escaping reality and enjoying all that was created for us.

        • Misty

          It can most definitely be done! We have 4 kids 8 & under, and we see and do EVERYTHING! I feel like if we will be spending that much $$, we need to experience it all. Now, in order to do that, we feel like 11 days makes doing EVERYTHING fun and not stressful. We take 2 days to travel, 3 at MK, 2 at EPCOT and HS, and 1 at AK with 1 day in the mix to chill at the resort. We can’t always do 11 days, so we do the highlights of each park and have a blast doing it!! Our last trip was in November, and I am feeling like we should be there – it’s summer!

          • Nicole L. Mancini

            Wow, every attraction and show??? I’d need a nap after the first day!

          • bill

            are you able to use fastpass majic bands from previous trips that are not linked to your new trip to get additonal fastpasses at the parks?

  • jnoble82

    I’ve been to Disney World twice the past two years. I’m making my first trip to Disneyland this September. Fastpasses aside, do think this would be a good thing to spend my time on? I don’t know how different DL is from WDW.

    • Nicole L. Mancini

      I think that this would be a great introduction to the park for first-time visitors. It’s certainly inexpensive when compared to other tours, too. I’d go for it! You’ll get access to five attractions, VIP viewing for a show, and the pin and lanyard while learning the layout of the parks. It’d be a perfect way to start a WDW vet’s trip.

      • enrai05

        At first I wasn’t going to recommend this to a first timer, but you’re right, Nicole. First time visitor can learn the layout of the parks while on the tour.

        I would also recommend taking this tour on a weekend, when the park will be busy. Go there first thing in the morning so you can enjoy some rides before it gets too busy, and then get ready for the tour.

  • http://www.chicagocarless.com MikeDoyle

    You’re applying WDW logic to DLR. Lines are almost always shorter at DLR than at WDW since there is much more to do in each DLR park than in the individual WDW parks. That makes Fastpasses less valuable on the west coast–and that’s why fewer attractions in Anaheim offer Fastpass. Moreover, you aren’t simply “purchasing Fastpasses” here. You need to participate in the tour to receive them. So you’re paying with your own time, as well. This isn’t an option you can repeat over and over unless you take the tour again and again. Were WDW to offer FP+ with the KTTK or BM tours, you’d still need to take those tours to receive them, too.

    Using DLR logic, shorter lines and strategic use of Fastpass on rides that offer it usually guarantee DLR visitors will get to ride what they want without having to fear the two- and three-hour lines you sometimes find at WDW. That means there’s really no benefit to taking a tour just for Fastpasses. The reason DLR offers Fastpasses for people who take the tours is to make up for the time you could be riding instead of being on the tour. It’s really just as simple as that.

    • Nicole L. Mancini

      I guess I’m also going in without the “commando tour” mentality which I haven’t employed in over ten years now. I’m not so sure that DLR parks have more to do than each WDW park. I’d have to look at a map to really tell; it certainly does not feel that way.

    • MaleficentRN

      You make a good point. I would be hard pressed to do it more than once. For a first time visitor, it makes sense.

  • Meredith

    I can answer this easily. Whenever I go to DLR in the Holiday season…I do the Christmas tour. Why? Because for the price of the tour you get two snacks, a souvenir mug of cocoa, a unique pin, and you get three important experiences. You get escorted ahead of even the fastpass lines onto Small World Holiday and Haunted Mansion Holiday. You also get priority viewing with seating for the Christmas Fantasy Parade. So would I pay $20 for the fastpasses? Yup.

  • Robert A. Perry

    If they start charging for FP, why not just go back to the old ticket system? It’s basically the same thing, no?

  • beerman42

    With our money becoming worthless and Disney having to raise prices at an excellerated rate I think your article is pointless. More more people I know can no longer go. We were On DCL Fantasy last week in May 2014 and went to Orlando a couple days early. Cant stay on ground to expensive, could not go to MK to ride 7DMT, $99.00 per person. 5 people stay at Residents Inn by Sea World and spent Friday at Adquita, purchase tickets on line in advance $28. So our limited Disney Dollars will reduce the times and places we can go. I like many think the new FP sucks. I am on vaction why should i have plan every move 60 or 30 days in advance. Have too many friends who have gone and do not like the royal pain in the — it is. Pay for FP Baw Humbug.

    • Nicole L. Mancini

      I’m sorry you feel that my article had no point. On the flip, it led to a good discussion both internally and in writing for many. Making a person think about topics like these was the goal. For me, point accomplished. :)

      • Barbara

        Thanks for the article Nicole I thought it was well done. You make valid points but growing up in a family where both parents were blue collar and had to make their money stretch – $20 on top of the ticket price means another few weeks of saving before going on vacation or doing without a few vinylmations. Paying for a ticket should grant everyone the same access.

      • Erin

        Thank you for the article! We went to DLR for the first time earlier this summer and had an amazing time! Getting right on two attractions, two FPs for later, and reserved seating for Aladdin! Heck yeah! I think we’ll do this tour again next year if it’s still available! We’re DVC members, so the discount will help!

  • Joni

    Tickets are expensive for many FAMILIES !! Now another fee on top I don’t think it is fair for families that can not afford an extra charge. You need to expand the parks to accommodate the crowds. People will come if you build more attractions you have the room to expand in Orlando not in Europe. Disney should be an USA based Park. Please don’t out price yourself so only the rich have special privileges. Keep Walt’s dream for families going.. Please no more extra $$$$…

  • Kathy

    We are contemplating a trip to visit DD1, which would include a couple of days in DL….and I would DEFINITELY buy this package! As an annual DVC visitor to WDW, however, I pick the tours carefully, as they are very pricey and I already pay a fortune for my tix etc. This year we are splurging on the African trek……will let you know how we like it!

    • Nicole L. Mancini

      I have wanted to do the Wild Africa Trek for awhile now, so I’m definitely curious as to your thoughts! I went on the Wild by Design tour years ago, and it honestly turned AK from a half a day park to my favorite!

      • Kathy

        Glad you liked the Wild By Design, Nicole! We considered that, but the Trek involves harnesses and swaying bridges….couldn’t resist. LOL…oh yeah, and food involved, too!

        • Bpatchy

          Kathy – I did Wild Africa Trek with a group of friends last October – it was great! You get to walk across the bridges and get up close to hippos and alligators. Safety is always first, so you are attached to a harness for anything they feel is more dangerous. The safari part of the tour is wonderful – they stop along the way – something the regular tour can’t do. At the end you have a snack in a canteen which most of us enjoyed – we did have one who wouldn’t try it. The jungle juice is so good. They also take photos of you all along the way, which they give you a link to and you can download them. I’ve been on a number of tours – this one is one of the best! You’ll love it!

          • Kathy

            Thanks for the encouraging comments! Can’t wait to try it. I was a little leery of the foods, but hey, I’ll try them!!!

  • Teresa M.

    As the Mom of 4 I say extra Fastpasses should be provided to larger families who stay on Disney property. With the extra costs of a suite (A regular room will not fit us anymore, nor is it even allowed for a family our size), tickets, and all our meals (3 out of 4 kids are big eaters), our August vacation is costing us an arm and a leg. Unfortunately we didn’t get one of the few rooms available during the room discount period. A few Fastpasses thrown our way for being valued guests would show that we (and our money) were extra appreciated!

    • Misty Domingue Pickrel

      Yay!! I am totally with you fellow mom-of-4!

    • Nicole L. Mancini

      In that respect, should extra FPs be given to those who stay at a higher tier of Disney resort (i.e. deluxe, home away from home)?

      • Teresa M.

        Absolutely. We get to WDW every 3-4 years and have stayed at The Contemporary with our kids (and The Polynesian on our honeymoon in 1995) until we had too many that will fit in a regular-sized room. We were priced out of the suites there, hence AOA suites! Fast-Passes would have been as appreciated then as they would be now!

      • msndis

        FWIW, I am not a fan of paying for a better experience in the parks. I have no problem with people paying for a nicer resort and/or more expensive meals but when it comes to touring the parks I really think everyone should be treated the same and have the same chances to go on the rides.
        I have two kids and one just graduated from college (and will be in the Disney College Program in August) and one is going to be a sophomore in college. We are going to WDW in September to visit our DCP kid and it’s the first real vacation we’ve had in 5 years because of college costs. We are able to stay at a value resort hotel and will get the free parking, transportation, earlier fastpass+ reservations, and extra magic hours offered to ALL resort guests. In addition, we got the free dining that was offered at all resort levels (but not at every resort). I would be very disappointed if the resort perks only pertained to the deluxe and moderate resort guests. I’m glad that WDW has an option for guests on a budget, otherwise we wouldn’t be able to make the trip. I can live with being in a basic motel room for 7 nights (we’ll barely be in the room) but I wouldn’t enjoy having to wait in the standby lines for every single ride just because I couldn’t afford a more expensive resort.

  • samharmone011

    The tour group picture by Space Mountain makes a sad statement about the condition of the people in our country. This is the demographic Disney is marketing for. Only one person is anywhere near a healthy BMI. Even the cast member is overweight.

  • MaleficentRN

    I’m interested in this tour! Do you know if it’s a once a day thing? What time of day? I’d love to do it on our arrival day (early afternoon), but I guess I’d need to use a ticket?
    Anyway, I’d pay $20 for all that swag! I think about it this way, how many hours would I have to work to get this? If I have to work three hours for my family to get essentially six FastPasses and that would save me from spending five hours of standing in lines, I’m all over it!

    • Nicole L. Mancini

      The tour runs Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays at 10:30 a.m. You need to check in at 10:15 though. It only runs once per day and requires park admission. I think it is a perfect way to start a DL trip.

  • pat

    Do you ever wonder, what would Walt think? Having grown
    up watching Walt Disney and the Wonderful World of Color, watching
    shows where Walt Disney talked with pride about this wonderful place
    that he had created for “All to enjoy”, I can’t help but question if he
    would be upset at the nickle and dime attitude that has taken over the
    Disney Co. Let’s face it, a trip to Disney is expensive. Especially if
    you live a plane ride away. Your expenses start at the airport where you
    park your car for an extended stay. There are plane tickets, perhaps
    drinks (especially when you have kids, even if you pack your own snacks)
    at layover airports. The cost of the hotel, the park tickets, meals,
    extra for Not So Scary Halloween, or Very Merry Christmas etc. and for some
    rental cars, not to mention the souvenirs. Some families save for years
    to take that ultimate trip to the Most Magical Place on Earth. Now
    Disney wants to start charging extra if you want your family to ride,
    and who doesn’t want to, the more popular rides. Is this because they
    can’t create a better system to accommodate the crowds or is it just the
    desire to make as much money as they can off visiting guests, who they
    know, want the ultimate experience for their families. You are there, you
    may not be back soon, so they have you right where they want you. It
    seems as if Disney is getting to the point where some families will be
    priced out, as if they have forgotten Walt’s own word’s, “To all who come to this happy place: Welcome. Disneyland is your land.” And yes, there are more parks now, but would Walt’s attitude have changed with the growth of his company? Would he be on board with this seemingly endless addition of fees or would he still put his guests first, looking for better ways for a better experience without pricing out those who can’s afford all the increases? I guess only Walt could answer that one.

  • pat

    Do you ever wonder, what would Walt think? Having grown
    up watching Walt Disney and the Wonderful World of Color, watching
    shows where Walt Disney talked with pride about this wonderful place
    that he had created for “All to enjoy”, I can’t help but question if he
    would be upset at the nickle and dime attitude that has taken over the
    Disney Co. Let’s face it, a trip to Disney is expensive. Especially if
    you live a plane ride away. Your expenses start at the airport where you
    park your car for an extended stay. There are plane tickets, perhaps
    drinks (especially when you have kids, even if you pack your own snacks)
    at layover airports. The cost of the hotel, the park tickets, meals,
    extra for Not So Scary Halloween, or Very Merry Christmas etc. and for some
    rental cars, not to mention the souvenirs. Some families save for years
    to take that ultimate trip to the Most Magical Place on Earth. Now
    Disney wants to start charging extra if you want your family to ride,
    and who doesn’t want to, the more popular rides. Is this because they
    can’t create a better system to accommodate the crowds or is it just the
    desire to make as much money as they can off visiting guests, who they
    know, want the ultimate experience for their families. You are there, you
    may not be back soon, so they have you right where they want you. It
    seems as if Disney is getting to the point where some families will be
    priced out, as if they have forgotten Walt’s own word’s, “To all who come to
    this happy place: Welcome. Disneyland is your land.” And yes, there are
    more parks now, but would Walt’s attitude have changed with the growth
    of his company? Would he be on board with this seemingly endless
    addition of fees or would he still put his guests first, looking for
    better ways for a better experience without pricing out those who can’t
    afford all the increases? I guess only Walt could answer that one.

  • daranaco

    I thought I would give some perspective for those concerned with how this tour will impact the wait times for everyone who cannot afford (or simply don’t want) to add this private tour to their vacation. Speaking in terms of pure statistics, the impact of this tour is statistically insignificant. DLR averages 44,000+ daily visitors. DCA averages 23,000+ daily visitors. The tour group of 20 people is equivalent to less than 1% of the visitors to DCA and less than 0.5% of the visitors to DLR on any given day. Plus the tour is only offered 4 days a week which means you can avoid this entirely by going on the other 3 days.

  • ldymcbth

    How long did the “tour + rides” part of the tour last if it started at 10:30? This would be worth the $$ for our upcoming Disneyland trip but only if it doesn’t last forever – because for us as well, the value is in those post-tour items and fastpasses. Thanks!

    • Nicole L. Mancini

      The tour is stated to last 2 1/2 hours, but ours was actually closer to 3.

  • Zolz

    I would have NO problem with paying for the system that they have at Universal in Florida…It was an extra $40ish for each of us and it was the best money I have ever spent at a theme park..I got essentially one fast pass for each attraction once…I got to take my time and visit everything with no stress of meeting a time window or in the old days of the Disney fast pass system running all over the park every two hours for the next one…I prefer Disney but they do this one thing better at Universal Studios Orlando and it makes for a much better day…So what you describe I would do with a smile on my face

  • Jeanne

    Just curious – I wonder how much a trip to Disneyland, complete with airfare, hotel, meals, etc., cost in the 1950s and 1960s, in the currency rates then, compared to now. Back then, if I remember correctly, there was a tiered ride ticket system, some rides were more expensive than others – you paid according to what attractions you wanted to do. Do you think (in 1960 dollars) it was less expensive for a family vacation?